Tag Archives: throne

Article: ‘Rightful Heir’ to British Monarchy Dies in Australia


For all the followers of the English monarchy out there (and there must be a few still – sorry, Australian Republican speaking), the link below is to an interesting article on the ‘true’ heir of the British throne.

For more visit:
http://www.smh.com.au/national/obituaries/the-jerilderie-man-who-could-have-been-king-20120705-21jwz.html

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Today in History: 20 January 1356


Scotland: Abdication of Edward Balliol from the Scottish Throne

The reign of Edward Balliol as Scottish monarch was assisted through the backing of Edward III of England, when he gained the crown in September 1332 through  what was essentially a coup with English complicity. The reign was interrupted after just three months by forces loyal to the true King of Scotland (David II) at the end of 1332 and he retreated to England.

In 1333, through the Battle of Halidon Hill, Balliol was restored to the throne. He was dethroned again in 1334 and gained it once again in 1335. However, he essentially lost the throne for all time in 1336. More battles would follow, but he had little true support in Scotland.

On this day in 1356, Balliol surrendered all claims to the Scottish throne to Edward III in exchange for an English pension.


Today in History – 1 May 1328 and 1707


Scotland: Independence Gained and Lost

Scotland became a unified kingdom in 843 under King Cináed I, who united the Scots and the Picts. It would grow in size over time, but the Kingdom of Scotland began in 843.

Edward 1 (England) brought the majority of Scotland under his control in 1296, though Scotland regained its independence via the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314. The wars for regaining Scottish independence was begun by William Wallace and Robert the Bruce (King Robert I). The independence of Scotland was recognized by England with the Treaty of Edinburgh-Northampton, signed on this day in 1328.

In 1603 the realms of England and Scotland were united by the accession of James VI to the throne of England. However, it wasn’t until this day in 1707, when the Treaty of Union was passed by the Parliament of Scotland which brought into being the United Kingdom. With this act Scotland lost its independence and there remains a movement to regain it.

 


Today in History – 23 April 1661


England: Charles II Crowned in Westminster Abbey

Following the death of Oliver Cromwell in 1658, political events led eventually to the restoration of the English monarchy and the ascension of Charles II to the throne of England, Scotland and Ireland. His father, Charles I, was executed by Oliver Cromwell at Whitehall on the 30th January 1649 towards the end of the English Civil War and Charles fled the country. With the death of Cromwell and the collapse of the English Commonwealth, Charles was invited to return to England and did so with great public fanfare on the 29th May 1660. He was crowned in Westminster Abbey on the 23rd April 1661.

For more on Charles II, visit:
Charles II

 


Today in History – 21 April 1509


King Henry VIII: Begins His Reign in England

Henry VIII was born Henry Tudor, to Henry VII (King of England) and Elizabeth of York on the 28th June 1491. His reign began on this day in 1509 and continued until his death on the 28th January 1547. He succeeded his father, Henry VII as King of England, Lord of Ireland and claimant to the throne of France. his reign lasted over 37 years and was perhaps one of the greatest (certainly one of the most powerful) kings in English history – not that this necessarily made him a great man.

Henry VIII is well known for his six wives and what became of them. He is also known for the part he played in the English Reformation. His split with the Roman Catholic Church saw the advance of Protestantism and the Reformation in England, though he remained theologically ‘Roman Catholic.’

For more on Henry VIII and the Tudor Dynasty, visit:
http://www.tudorhistory.org/

 


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