Tag Archives: Scottish

Article: Death By Tooth


The link below is to an article covering the story of the death of Sigurd Eysteinsson in Scottish history. He was basically killed by a tooth.

For more visit:
http://www.mentalfloss.com/blogs/archives/94686

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Today in History: 25 January 1759


Robert Burns Day/Burns Night – Burns Supper

This day is known as Robert Burns Day in Scotland, which is of course the day on which the famous Scottish poet Robert Burns, was born. Burns was born on this day in 1759.

Wherever Robert Burns is remembered, a Burns Supper is generally held on or about Robert Burns Day/Night. These suppers usually include a haggis, Scotch whisky and the reading/recitation of poetry written by Robert Burns.

For more on  Burns Suppers visit:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burns_supper

For a book by Thomas Carlyle, ‘Burns,’ visit:
http://www.archive.org/details/burns01carl


Today in History: 20 January 1356


Scotland: Abdication of Edward Balliol from the Scottish Throne

The reign of Edward Balliol as Scottish monarch was assisted through the backing of Edward III of England, when he gained the crown in September 1332 through  what was essentially a coup with English complicity. The reign was interrupted after just three months by forces loyal to the true King of Scotland (David II) at the end of 1332 and he retreated to England.

In 1333, through the Battle of Halidon Hill, Balliol was restored to the throne. He was dethroned again in 1334 and gained it once again in 1335. However, he essentially lost the throne for all time in 1336. More battles would follow, but he had little true support in Scotland.

On this day in 1356, Balliol surrendered all claims to the Scottish throne to Edward III in exchange for an English pension.


Today in History – 1 May 1328 and 1707


Scotland: Independence Gained and Lost

Scotland became a unified kingdom in 843 under King Cináed I, who united the Scots and the Picts. It would grow in size over time, but the Kingdom of Scotland began in 843.

Edward 1 (England) brought the majority of Scotland under his control in 1296, though Scotland regained its independence via the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314. The wars for regaining Scottish independence was begun by William Wallace and Robert the Bruce (King Robert I). The independence of Scotland was recognized by England with the Treaty of Edinburgh-Northampton, signed on this day in 1328.

In 1603 the realms of England and Scotland were united by the accession of James VI to the throne of England. However, it wasn’t until this day in 1707, when the Treaty of Union was passed by the Parliament of Scotland which brought into being the United Kingdom. With this act Scotland lost its independence and there remains a movement to regain it.

 


Today in History – 27 April 1124


Scotland: David I Becomes King

On this day in 1124, upon the death of his brother Alexander I, David (Dabíd mac Maíl Choluim) made himself king of Scotland with the full backing of Henry I of England. He had been Prince of the Cumbrians (1113-1124) before becoming King of Scotland (1124-1153). Cumbria was in effect a separate kingdom to that of Scotland (known as Alba) to the north and became merged with it upon the ascension of David to King of Scotland.

His reign was one of warfare and expansion, with the first 10 years of his reign involving a struggle for power with his nephew (the son of Alexander I) Máel Coluim mac Alaxandair. With the death of Henry I of England, he came into conflict with King Stephen and expanding the Scottish Kingdom into northern England.

David I is seen as a ‘reformer’ in the Scottish Church, setting out to reorganise the church. The map in this post shows the boundaries of the various dioceses he put in place. He is also seen as a reformer of Scotland as a whole, bringing civility to a barbaric country.

David I was born between 1083 and 1085, and died on the 24th May 1153. He is buried in Dunfermline Abbey. He was succeeded by Malcolm IV.

 


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