Tag Archives: military

Article: Abandoned military Installations Around the World


The link below is to a very interesting article that takes a look at a number of abandoned military installations from around the world and includes a number of photos.

For more visit:
http://weburbanist.com/2013/03/04/7-abandoned-wonders-of-military-architecture/

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Article: Guernsey – German Military Underground Hospital


The link below is to an article that takes a look at a German Military Underground Hospital built during WWII on Guernsey, a territory of the United Kingdom.

For more visit:
http://www.atlasobscura.com/places/german-military-underground-hospital


Article: A Look Back in Time – Former Soviet Military Bases


The link below is to an article (with photos) that reports on a number of former Soviet military bases and the state they are now in.

For more visit:
http://www.environmentalgraffiti.com/news-haunting-photographs-abandoned-soviet-military-bases-0


Article: World War I – The Ottoman Empire and the Balkan Region


The following link is to an article that looks at the lead up to World War I and the military situation in the Balkans region.

For more visit:
http://www.mentalfloss.com/blogs/archives/132566


Article: WWII – Operation Fortitude


The link below is to an article concerning Operation Fortitude in WWII. Operation Fortitude was based on deceiving the German military by the creation of fake armies and operations.

For more, visit:
http://www.mentalfloss.com/blogs/archives/118080


Today in History: 29 January 1856


Victoria Cross: Introduced to Honour Acts of Valour in Crimean War

On this day in 1856, Queen Victoria established the military medal known as the Victoria Cross. It was the highest military decoration issued for valour in the face of the enemy within the British Empire and now the Commonwealth. It was first introduced to honour members of the armed forces who fought in the Crimean War.

For more visit:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria_Cross


Today in History – 14 May 1955


The Treaty of Friendship, Cooperation and Mutual Assistance is Signed

The Treaty of Friendship, Cooperation and Mutual Assistance, also known as the Warsaw Pact, was signed in Warsaw, Poland. This was the military alliance signed by the Eastern Bloc of nations, namely the Soviet Union, Poland, East Germany, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria and Albania. The treaty came about in response to West Germany being included in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) on the 9 May 1955. These were the two major treaties to come out of post war (WWII) Europe and were the opposing parties of the Cold War.

For more information on the Cold War see:
http://www.coldwar.org/

Timeline of the Cold War:
http://library.thinkquest.org/10826/timeline.htm

 


Today in History – 28 April 1789


William Bligh: Mutiny on the Bounty

William Bligh was born on the 9th September 1754 to Francis and Jane Bligh in St Tudy, Cornwall. He was signed up for a career in the Royal Navy when aged 7 in 1761.

In 1776, Bligh was with Captain James Cook as Sailing Master on the Resolution for Cook’s third and final voyage during which Cook was killed. Following this Bligh served on various ships and saw military action at a number of locations including Gibraltar in 1782.

In 1787 Bligh was made commander of the Bounty. On this day in 1789, the mutiny on the Bounty took place. The mutiny was led by Fletcher Christian, Master’s Mate. Bligh and a large number of the crew were provided with a ship’s launch and a small amount of provisions and Bligh made for Timor (from near Tonga). The journey was completed in 47 days and covered a remarkable distance of 6 700km.

It is thought that the mutiny took place in order to escape from the hardline discipline of Bligh and to escape to the island pleasures of Tahiti. Evidence would suggest that Bligh was far more easy going than other captains, though the future ‘mutiny’ in Sydney (see below) would suggest otherwise. Bligh was treated well in the court-martial and was acquitted.

From the Bounty, Bligh served in various roles, including Governor of New South Wales from the 13th August 1806 to the 26th January 1808. His post ended with the Rum Rebellion, which essentially was an on land mutiny by the New South Wales Corps under Major George Johnston. He succeeded Philip Gidley King and was replaced by Lachlan Macquarie.

Bligh’s rise through the ranks of the Royal Navy continued until he was appointed Vice Admiral of the Blue in 1814, though he never again received an active command. He died on the 7th December 1817.

As an interesting side point, the current premier of Queensland (Anna Bligh) is a descendant of William Bligh.

 


Today in History – 25 April 1915


ANZAC: First Landings at Gallipoli – Turkey

Around the world today, Australians and New Zealanders will be remembering the fallen, on what is now known to us as ANZAC Day. ANZAC Day is remembered annually on the anniversary of the first major military action fought by the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps during World War I. On this day in 1915, ANZAC troops landed on the beach of what is now Anzac Cove. Gallipoli was evacuated in December 1915. The campaign was a disaster, but a legend was born out of it, that of ANZAC.

ABOVE: Map Showing the Location of Gallipoli

ANZAC Day was officially held for the first time in 1916 with a number of ceremonies and services held in Australia, New Zealand, England and Egypt. It was not until 1927 however, that Australians held their first uniform remembrance day and it became more established after that.

From the Second World War, ANZAC Day took on a broader significance, as a day to remember the men and women who made the ultimate sacrifice for their country in both Australia and New Zealand.

For more visit these sites:

 


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