Tag Archives: map

United Kingdom: England – The Plague in London (1665)


The link below is to an article that takes an in depth look at the plague deaths in London during 1665 and maps them.

For more visit:
http://www.theguardian.com/society/ng-interactive/2015/aug/12/london-great-plague-1665-bills-of-mortality


Vikings: Vinland Map



Article: Maps of Africa in 1870 and 1910


The link below is to an article containing maps of Africa from both 1870 and 1910 – quite interesting to students of world affairs, maps, etc.

For more visit:
http://twentytwowords.com/2013/06/30/maps-of-africa-in-1870-and-1910/


USA: Civil War – Gettysburg



Article: A Bit of Baltic and Polish History


The link below is to an article looking at the boundaries of the Baltic and Polish states. It looks at the history of the territory in these countries.

For more visit:
http://bigthink.com/strange-maps/576-baltic-ifs-and-polish-buts


Today in History: 13 April 1861


Fort Sumter Surrenders to Confederate Troops

ABOVE: Fort Sumter

ABOVE: Fort Sumter from the Charleston Defences

On this day in 1861, Fort Sumter, the island fort in the entrance to Charleston Harbor surrendered to Confederate troops following a fierce bombardment that had begun the previous day. The Battle of Fort Sumter was the first major battle of the American Civil War.

For more, visit:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Sumter
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Fort_Sumter

Books:
Within Fort Sumter, by A. Fletcher
Major Robert Anderson and Fort Sumter, by Eba Anderson Lawton


Today in History: 25 February 1947


Germany: Prussia is No More

On this day in 1947, the German state of Prussia was removed from the map. The complex story of Prussia and Germany came to an official end with Law #46 of the Allied Control Council following the German defeat in World War II. Prussia was divided up and formed parts of other states including both East and West Germany, as well as Poland and the Soviet Union.

For more, visit:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prussia


Today in History – 27 April 1124


Scotland: David I Becomes King

On this day in 1124, upon the death of his brother Alexander I, David (Dabíd mac Maíl Choluim) made himself king of Scotland with the full backing of Henry I of England. He had been Prince of the Cumbrians (1113-1124) before becoming King of Scotland (1124-1153). Cumbria was in effect a separate kingdom to that of Scotland (known as Alba) to the north and became merged with it upon the ascension of David to King of Scotland.

His reign was one of warfare and expansion, with the first 10 years of his reign involving a struggle for power with his nephew (the son of Alexander I) Máel Coluim mac Alaxandair. With the death of Henry I of England, he came into conflict with King Stephen and expanding the Scottish Kingdom into northern England.

David I is seen as a ‘reformer’ in the Scottish Church, setting out to reorganise the church. The map in this post shows the boundaries of the various dioceses he put in place. He is also seen as a reformer of Scotland as a whole, bringing civility to a barbaric country.

David I was born between 1083 and 1085, and died on the 24th May 1153. He is buried in Dunfermline Abbey. He was succeeded by Malcolm IV.

 


Today in History – 25 April 1915


ANZAC: First Landings at Gallipoli – Turkey

Around the world today, Australians and New Zealanders will be remembering the fallen, on what is now known to us as ANZAC Day. ANZAC Day is remembered annually on the anniversary of the first major military action fought by the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps during World War I. On this day in 1915, ANZAC troops landed on the beach of what is now Anzac Cove. Gallipoli was evacuated in December 1915. The campaign was a disaster, but a legend was born out of it, that of ANZAC.

ABOVE: Map Showing the Location of Gallipoli

ANZAC Day was officially held for the first time in 1916 with a number of ceremonies and services held in Australia, New Zealand, England and Egypt. It was not until 1927 however, that Australians held their first uniform remembrance day and it became more established after that.

From the Second World War, ANZAC Day took on a broader significance, as a day to remember the men and women who made the ultimate sacrifice for their country in both Australia and New Zealand.

For more visit these sites:

 


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