Tag Archives: capital

Article: Peru – Mochica Capital Dig


The link below is to an article reporting on the findings of an archaeological dig in northern Peru at the site of a Mochica capital.

For more visit:
http://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com.au/2013/09/archaeologists-explore-last-capital-of.html

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Article: Lancaster – Capital of the USA


The link below is to an article that looks at a time when Lancaster was the capital of revolutionary America.

For more visit:
http://www.mentalfloss.com/blogs/archives/101689


Article: Archaeology – Aztec Mass Sacrifice Find in Mexico City


The link below is to an article (with pictures) reporting on the discovery of a mass sacrifice pit under Mexico City, on the site of the Aztec capital Tenochtitlan.

For more visit:
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2012/08/pictures/120829-aztec-sacrifice-templo-mayor-bones-archaeology/


Article: Serbia – Archaeologists Discover Mammoth Remains


Not far from the Serbian capital of Belgrade, archaeologists have discovered a treasure trove of mammoth remains. At least five mammoths have been discovered at the Kostolac Coal Mine.

For more visit:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/europe/serbian-archaeologists-discover-rare-mammoth-field-in-open-pit-mine-east-of-capital-belgrade/2012/06/20/gJQAhTdtpV_story.html


Today in History: 10 May 1940


World War II: The United Kingdom Invades Iceland

On this day in 1940, Operation Fork (The Invasion of Iceland) began early in the morning in the capital Reykjavik. The objective was to prevent German occupation and the promise was made to withdraw at the conclusion of the war. The British troops were relieved by American troops a year later, before the US had officially entered the war.

For more, visit:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Invasion_of_Iceland
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Occupation_of_Iceland


Today in History – 8 May 1821


Greece: Greek War of Independence – The Battle of Gravia Inn

Today in 1821, during the Greek War of Independence (against the Ottoman Empire), the Battle of Gravia Inn took place. In this amazing battle, Odysseas Androutsos led 120 men against an army of 9 000 men belonging to the Ottoman Army.

Fresh from victory over Greek forces at the Battle of Alamana, the Ottoman Army under Omer Vrioni was moving to attack the Peloponnese. However, they ran into the small force led by Androutsos at Gravia (Greece), who had fortified themselves within the inn.

A number of attacks on the inn took place with the Ottoman Army suffering heavy casualties and the Greeks very few (6 only). Vrioni odered up his artillery and during this time the Greeks managed to slip away through the Ottoman lines.

As a consequence of his heavy losses (some 300 dead and 800 more wounded), Vrioni retreated and withdrew. During this time the Greeks consolidated their position in the Peloponnese, including the capture of the Ottoman capital in the Peloponnese – Tripoli.

 


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