Tag Archives: buried

Article: Archaeology – Nottinghamshire’s ‘Lost Village’


The link below is to an article reporting on a buried village discovered in Nottinghamshire.

For more visit:
http://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com.au/2013/07/traces-of-lost-village-found-in.html

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Article: Shipwreck Buried for Preservation in Victoria


Burying what is discovered in order to preserve it because it is too expensive to do otherwise – I can’t say I’m a fan of doing that. I understand the reasoning behind it, I do, but surely our history needs to be preserved in a manner that people who are outside the elite, rich, know, etc, can also have an opportunity to embrace and cherish it. Burying it again, it is pretty much gone forever and will not be able to be viewed again. I think it is a tragic loss.

Post your thoughts on the practice in the comments – would be interested to hear them.

The link below is to an article reporting on a shipwreck buried again for preservation in Australia.

For more visit:
http://www.australiangeographic.com.au/journal/historic-shipwreck-buried-in-seafloor.htm


Article: China – Archaeologists Discover Mass Grave of Burried Buddha Statues


The following link is to an article reporting on the discovery of some 3000 buried Buddha statues in China. The statues are thought to date back to the Eastern Wei and Northern Qi dynasties.

For more, visit:
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2012/04/pictures/120417-3000-ancient-buddhas-china-world-science/


Today in History – 27 April 1124


Scotland: David I Becomes King

On this day in 1124, upon the death of his brother Alexander I, David (Dabíd mac Maíl Choluim) made himself king of Scotland with the full backing of Henry I of England. He had been Prince of the Cumbrians (1113-1124) before becoming King of Scotland (1124-1153). Cumbria was in effect a separate kingdom to that of Scotland (known as Alba) to the north and became merged with it upon the ascension of David to King of Scotland.

His reign was one of warfare and expansion, with the first 10 years of his reign involving a struggle for power with his nephew (the son of Alexander I) Máel Coluim mac Alaxandair. With the death of Henry I of England, he came into conflict with King Stephen and expanding the Scottish Kingdom into northern England.

David I is seen as a ‘reformer’ in the Scottish Church, setting out to reorganise the church. The map in this post shows the boundaries of the various dioceses he put in place. He is also seen as a reformer of Scotland as a whole, bringing civility to a barbaric country.

David I was born between 1083 and 1085, and died on the 24th May 1153. He is buried in Dunfermline Abbey. He was succeeded by Malcolm IV.

 


Today in History – 24 April 1731


England: Daniel Defoe Died

On this day in 1731, English author Daniel Defoe died. He is best known for his novel ‘Robinson Crusoe.’ Defoe is recognized as one of the earliest authors of English novels and wrote over 500 books, pamphlets and journals. He was also recognized as something of a financial journalist.

Daniel Defoe was born some time between 1659 and 1661 – the exact date of his birth being unknown. He was born Daniel Foe (the ‘De’ being added later).

In his youth his family survived the Great Fire of London (1666), which left only his family’s home, and two others standing, in their part of London. A year later he survived a Dutch fleet that sailed up the Thames and attacked Chatham.

Defoe was a Christian and a Dissenter. At one time he was jailed for his views and in an earlier time was also a bankrupt. It is thought that he may have died while in hiding from those seeking him out because of unpaid debts. Defoe died  on the 24th April 1731 and is buried in Bunhill Fields, London.

Among Defoe’s many works are ‘Robinson Crusoe’ and ‘Moll Flanders.’

A biography of Daniel Defoe by William Minto can be found at the Internet Archive:
http://www.archive.org/details/daniel00defoemintrich

The Life and Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, by Daniel Defoe:
http://www.archive.org/details/lifeadventuresof00defouoft

Moll Flanders, by Daniel Defoe:
http://www.archive.org/details/fortunesandmisfo00defouoft

 


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